Trans Schooling: Kelli Lox on Drugs, Sexuality, and an Academy for Trans Girls

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TransEthics: What do you do besides escorting?

Kelli Lox: I star in porn, and I have lots of projects in the works. And I interact with fans and peers on twitter. which is super fun.

TE: Your tweets are both insightful and witty. What inspires your sense of humor?

KL: Well… my PR lady tells me not to talk about drugs in interviews, so … ummmm. … I guess my love of history, and science, and real-world interests and hobbies. I genuinely find so many things interesting and I love being able to share that. I like taking things that ppl don’t see often together, like spirituality and sex, or history and sex, or, well anything plus sex really (laughs) and putting them together in novel ways that makes people think while they laugh, and pull down their pants to masturbate. I have that freedom to tweet about anything I want to, and the brains to make it clever, thank goodness. Sometimes, I am actually educating people about something, but really I’m just making a dumb joke. I love that. Continue reading

Trans Masculinity: James Darling on Gaining Male Privilege, the Trans 100, and Making a Difference

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Trans Ethics: We’ve interviewed trans-masculine non-binary people here before, but never a trans man, so you get to pop the cherry here. Do you feel trans men are ignored in the media?

James Darling: Trans men are often not represented in mainstream media as much as trans women. I think that has to do with a lot of factors, one of them being that there just aren’t as many higher profile trans male celebrities as there are trans women celebrities. I also think most people are unfamiliar with what trans men are, and maybe don’t find it as interesting tabloid fodder as they do with trans women, and that probably has more to do with transmisogyny than anything else. For example, trans men are more often celebrated for wanting to be men vs the way trans women are often looked down on for wanting to be women.

TE: Would you be so kind as to tell us some of the issues trans men face?  Continue reading

Trans Navigation: Tiffany Starr on Living Stealth, Getting into Sex Work, and Zombies

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TransEthics: How did you get into the sex industry?

Tiffany Starr: I’ve always thought it would be cool to be in the adult entertainment industry, but I never thought I would actually do it. It seems a lot of people fantasize about it at one time or another. It started a little over five years ago. I was working as a receptionist for a large software company. My job had a lot of down time and paid very well. I had a girlfriend at the time named Sarah to whom I was very attached to, and a great car to boot. That all changed in one month.

My car was totaled by a pickup truck and insurance paid just enough to cover the loan. A week after that I was laid off because the company was downsizing and cutting corners. A few days after that my girlfriend at the time and I broke up. I was left devastated, depressed, and with a lot of unpaid bills. Due to the economy being in shambles it was tough finding a replacement job.

Thus I grew desperate and reached out to a friend of mine who just so happened to be a popular transsexual porn star. She offered me a shoot on her website and that all I would need to do if fly to L.A. I decided to contact all the porn companies I could before going out there, because if I was going to shoot one scene I may as well shoot a bunch. It was only supposed to be a temporary fix until I found a new job. However after shooting for most of the major Transsexual porn sites out there I grew popular. It was then that SMC (shemaleclub) offered me a website in their network. I took the offer and I have been shooting porn ever since. Continue reading

Trans Trials: Erin Fernandes on Transition as a Business Owner, Privilege, and Finding Oneself

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TransEthics: When did you first come out as transgender?

Erin Fernandes: About 13 years ago, but I was just cross-dressing at the time and my wife caught me. I almost ended up in a divorce. My father in law researched transgender and explained it to my wife, saving my marriage for the time being. But it was just a family secret for years. Very few knew, just my wife, and in-laws. It’s only been about a year that I have been me in public.

TE: How did the rest of your family react to you coming out?

EF: Most didn’t accept it. My mother still has a hard time with it. I had to help educate her on the subject. And she’s got a doctorates degree — go figure (laughs). Lots of tension between my brother-in-law and I still, but he’s coming around, not that I care. The way I see it is, if you can’t accept me for who I am, why should I accept them? But all in all its been a pretty easy transformation for me. My wife has been my biggest support through everything. Continue reading

Trans Standards: Michelle Austin on Body Positivity, Beauty Expectations, and Changing the Game

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TransEthics: What were you doing before you got into sex work?

Michelle Austin: I was a hair dresser. I spent over eight years working in a high-end salon in Chicago area. It was the best experience I ever had but after eight plus years the owner shut it down. We both went to work for another salon but I fell out of love for the industry. I think it had to do more so with I was depressed with the Chicago weather and having back and hand issues. Which comes from doing that kind of work. I also transitioned in that job. So, part of me misses it because it’s a big part of my life. I ran the salon the last two years which also helped me learn a lot of business skills I carry with me today.

TE: What attracted you to the sex industries? Continue reading

Trans Controversial: Kelly Klaymour on the Sex Industry, SJWs, and Ethics in Feminism

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TransEthics: What is it that first attracted you to sex work?

Kelly Klaymour: I thought there was way more money in it than there actually is… like enough to pay for SRS kind of scrilla. [But] little did I know… (laughs) Plus, I never have really had issue with being naked, so hey why not get to bone [girls who are] way out of my league and –what I thought would be– a decent living. (laughter)

TE: You mentioned before that you tend to be a bit more conservative than others I’ve interviewed. Would you expand a little on that?

KK: Sure thing. I had considered myself quite far on the left side, until being apart of this community for an extended amount of time. I’ve slowly realized I’m what’s considered a “shitlord” of sorts now (laughs). I guess my main issue that ends up blowing up into debates over social media is my opinion that nobody is entitled to [porn]work, and that I support the industry as a free market capitalistic complex.

TE: Having said that, I’ve noticed there seems to be a very public struggle on social media between independent porn studios, and the established big-name TS porn companies. Do you have any thoughts on that? Continue reading

Trans Triumphs: Christy Pierson on Realizing Childhood Dreams, Religion, and Sexuality

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TransEthics: When did you come out as transgender?

Christy Pierson: Initially in 1999 when I was living in North Idaho, but there was not enough support there to transition. There had been a trans woman on a local Police Dept who had lost her job because of being trans right around that time too. She later was awarded back pay and her job back. I decided that the time was not correct and headed back into being all the man I could be.

Ten years later in 2009 is when I could no longer keep the door on it’s hinges or patch it up enough and I admited to being Christy. It really was a life or death time… I was drinking myself to death.

TE: There’s a lot of stories in the media regarding trans children. When you hear such stories, are you envious at all?

CP: Yes and No. Yes, because there are things which would not have developed and I now need to correct. Such as trachea, facial hair and voice among other things. Continue reading

Trans Erasure: Riley Alejandro on Non-Binary Issues, Genderfucking, and Media

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TransEthics: When did you first realize that you’re transgender?

Riley Alejandro: I didn’t know that transgender was a thing until I was at least in my teens, probably around thirteen or fourteen, when I had access to the internet. I first started expressing issues with being told I was a girl around 8 is my first thought of it, telling my parents that I wasn’t a girl, that I was a boy and making up a lie as to why. I was forced to go to therapy. That’s when I also learned that this wasn’t something that people accepted too well. Continue reading

Trans Losses: Jules Vilmur on Raising a Trans Teen, and Fixing Society

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Editor’s note: Suicide and the loss of a child are discussed in this interview. Appropriate trigger warnings apply.

TransEthics: You are the first cis person to be interviewed by TransEthics. Being the parent of a trans child, I imagine you have a somewhat unique perspective. But first, tell me how you personally feel about the use of the words “cis” and “cisgender”.

Jules Vilmur: I hear people complain about the use of cis and cisgender, but it doesn’t bother me. I get the need for it in conversations about gender and such. There’s a lot of eye-rolling by cis people at the thought of having to qualify their gender but for me it’s a way of understanding that gender sometimes does need qualification. Continue reading

Trans Brilliance: CN Lester on Music, Psychology, Gender, and Activism

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TransEthics: I’ve interviewed a couple of non-binary people in the past. How do you define “non-binary”?

CN Lester: I would probably say that I don’t define it — I think the very appeal is that there is no fixed definition — or, rather, than everyone has their own, and we respect individual interiority — that’s the whole point. I don’t personally used the term non-binary (unless repeating someone else’s choice to use it) for a number of reasons.

The main reason being that gender is not a binary. Sex is not a binary. It never has been, it never will be, and I object to having to define myself, and the whole complex web of humanity, in reference to a lie which has caused untold damage. As ever, that’s not to say that men and women aren’t men and women — just that there have always been more descriptors than just those two, that those descriptors need not be fixed to specific entry requirements, and that every person (man, woman, neither, both, either, more options) will have their own take on what gender and sex mean.

TE: What does gender mean to you? Continue reading